Reaction Paper to the new Article 12 “Infrastructure for sustainable mobility” of the Revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (2010/31/EU, EPBD)

Download PDF here

Last year, 2021, set a record for the battery electric vehicle (EV) sales, which achieved 10%[1] of total sales in the European automotive market. This trend is expected to continue to rise, driven by the new ambitious objectives set by the EU along with the national recovery plans implemented by Member States. However, the challenge remains immense. Indeed, the number of EVs is set to increase throughout the EU as a result of the proposed ban of internal combustion engines (ICE) sales by 2035, set out in the revision of the Regulation on the CO2 standards for cars and vans as part of the Fit for 55. Consumer demand for electric bicycles is also increasing strongly, with more than 4.5 million units sold in 2020, representing more than 20% of total sales.

If Europe is to succeed in its transition towards zero-emission mobility, the correct charging infrastructure needs to be put in place to push the EV market into achieving the required growth and ensuring a positive customer experience. Here, the deployment of private charging is of the utmost importance for encouraging the growth of electromobility, as 90% of all charging takes place at home or in the workplace. However, the current electromobility provisions of the Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD) will fall significantly short in establishing the right conditions for the widespread adoption of EVs.

The Platform for electromobility therefore fully supports the revision of the EPBD

The Platform for electromobility therefore fully supports the revision of the EPBD presented in December 2021, as it is the main EU legislation for addressing private charging. The introduction of Art. 12 in the Commission’s proposal, which relates to electromobility in buildings, is therefore central to supporting zero-emission mobility in the EU. In particular, the Platform welcomes the:

Provisions we support

However, the Platform believes that further improvements are needed, and has therefore set out five recommendations:

Clarify the scope of application of Art. 12.

The way Art. 12 is currently drafted could be interpreted as meaning that requirements only apply to parking spaces if ‘the car park is physically adjacent to the building’ but not if it is ‘located inside the building’. We believe this is not the Commission's intention and therefore ask for further clarification.

Ensure charging solutions in existing buildings.

Some 80% of the EU’s current building stock will still be in use by 2050, with the average annual major renovation rate just 2.7% for non-residential buildings and 1.5% for residential buildings. As a result, the EC should ensure the installation of charging points in existing buildings.

Our key recommendations

Completing the charging requirements for new and under major renovation buildings.

The Platform asks to complete the charging requirements for new buildings and buildings undergoing renovation in order to mandate the deployment of smart-charging ready recharging points in all new and existing buildings.

Our key recommendations

Reinforce the deployment of smart charging functionalities

The development of smart charging and bidirectional charging (V2G) in buildings is an opportunity for EV users. It provides a superior charging experience and reduces the consumers’ electricity bill. Indeed, in France, on average with V2G, the annual cost of recharging an electric vehicle is 240€/year, compared to 420€/year without smart charging functionalities. The Commission has recognised, in its AFIR Impact Assessment, that every smart recharging point could on average create a system benefit of more than 100€/year by 2030. Smart charging also reintegrates electricity surpluses into the grids (V2G) and/or reuse it in the buildings (V2B) and homes (V2H), as well as supporting the uptake of electromobility. It can also create synergies with renewable energies, by integrating them into the electricity grids and providing flexibility services to the system. Furthermore, smart charging complements the right-to-plug by ensuring that charging points optimise the use of the grid capacity of a building and removes the argument that grid connections need to be reinforced.

Our key recommendations

Reinforce the measures to ensure pre-cabling

Pre-cabling of buildings should refer to both the technical cabling (cable path, technical sheaths, drilling) and the electrical pre-equipment in collective electrical installations (switchboard, horizontal electrical column, bus cable).

The comprehensive pre-cabling of buildings will enable the subsequent connection of individual charging points, at minimum cost, by simply installing a home charger. Furthermore, the pre-cabling of renovated buildings is a low hanging fruit, with little cost involved when done during the construction phase – which is the most efficient way to do it. Cabling after construction is completed is not cost-efficient and would lead to highly cumbersome discussions with project developers. Ducting infrastructure is a future-proof and cost-effective solution, the installation cost of which is minimal when compared to the total cost of constructing or renovating a building. By way of comparison, failure to ensure ducting infrastructure would entail costs that could be up to nine times higher if a building needs to be retrofitted.

Our key recommendations