CO2 Standards for HDVs: Our open letter to Commissioner Breton to boost clean tech industries

Open letter

Cleantech companies and civil society see ambitious truck CO2 standards as catalyst for growing EU supply chains

Adressed to Commissioner Thierry Breton

Our open letter on clean trucksOur recommendations to the European Commission

Dear Commissioner Breton,

We, a large group of industries and civil society organisations stakeholders from the freight, e-mobility and clean tech supply chain, welcome your efforts to respond to the U.S. IRA and boost investments into sustainable and clean European technologies. As we are actively working on the decarbonisation of our industry branches, we fully support the targets of the European Green Deal and Europe’s 2030 and 2050 climate targets.

The Smart & Sustainable Mobility Strategy sets a clear goal for Europe to reduce transport emissions by 90% in 2050. Decarbonising freight transport will require reducing its dependency on fossil fuels, shifting a larger share of traffic to more sustainable transport modes and finally through the internalisation of external costs. The upcoming CO2 performance standards for heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) will stimulate the investments required to achieve the first of these objectives. Cleantech in the EU road freight and heavy-duty vehicle infrastructure sectors is in the early stages. By mirroring the new targets for trucks to the blueprint Europe has just set out for its automotive sector, these sectors can surf on and amplify each other’s supply chains. Mandating around half of new trucks to be zero emission from 2030 and almost all of them from 2035 will shore up demand for battery cells made in EU gigafactories and staffed with EU workers. A balanced policy mix matches increased governmental investment support with such greater demands from, and clarity on the shared end goals for, our EU industries. This will help greening homegrown EU freight sector that can compete with, and ultimately again overcome, competition from across the oceans.

Today, zero-emission trucks are still produced in small numbers. Ambitious standards for trucks can achieve what has been done for cars: seriously scaling up the supply, thereby bringing down the cost per unit. Whilst the CO2 standards as a regulatory tool safeguard the roadmap for a rapid green transition, the subsidies funnel money directly into the sustainable freight and mobility solutions to enable and ensure a thriving European clean tech industry. That way all actors, especially smaller and medium-sized companies, remain competitive and can be part of Europe’s green transition.

We, the undersigned organisations, see ambitious CO2 targets for trucks as an essential means to ensure EU cleantech investments are boosted and channelled into sustainable road freight technologies. This complements the parallel push to switch traffic to more sustainable modes of transport and the internalisation of external costs. Green technologies – from renewable energy to battery production – will secure and provide jobs in Europe, now and in the future. Strong CO2 standards provide certainty to our European industries in a challenging and changing world. And they utilise the momentum of progressive frontrunners that have shown electric trucks are part of Europe’s flagship clean technologies.

 


EPBD: 3 Pillars to ensure the private charging of EVs

3 Pillars to ensure the private charging of EVs

As 90% of all charging takes place at home or in the workplace and 80% of the EU’s current building stock will still be in use by 2050, private charging is key to the growth of electromobility. Only an ambitious revision of the EPBD (Art. 12) can make it happen.

Importance of private charging
for multifamily dwellings

Pre-cabling

If a building is not pre-cabled in the construction or major renovation phase, it can be 9 times more expensive to install cables in the latter stage. It'd lead to highly cumbersome discussions with project developers which can take over 6 months in problematic cases to install a charging station. The pre-cabling should cover both technical and electrical installations for the seamless future installation of recharging points.

for users and grid

Smart functionalities

Smart charging (uni- and bi-directional) can reduce one-third of the EV users' electricity bill. Moreover, it would facilitate the integration of the renewable energies into the grid, reduce the electricity consumption during peak hours and provide flexibility services to the system.

For existing buildings

Right-to-plug

Those advantages would not be reached without removing administrative barriers to installing a charging station, especially the delays in multifamily buildings. Time between application and installation should not exceed 3 months.


[Video] The Importance of the AFIR with Koen Noyens (EVBOX)

AFI Regulation
Explained by our member EVBOX

When it comes to charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Regulation or AFIR is one of the most important EU policy files being discussed today. It defines the legislative framework for public charging for the next decade and is instrumental to realising the Green Deal.

The AFIR is indeed vital for realising a dense, accessible and user-friendly charging network across Europe.

The Platform for electromobility is a strong advocate for creating a uniform EV charging market through binding targets set at Member State level. We believe that through a harmonized Regulation, we can avoid the risk of creating a two speed Europe regarding the EV charging rollout.

The Platform supports both ambitious fleet-based targets as well as distance-based targets across the European highways network.

We need to get going now. We call on the European Parliament and the Council to agree on an AFIR fit for the Green Deal. There is no time to lose to reach our climate targets! You can find more details on our recommendations on Commission’s proposal under the video.


"A Contresens" documentary in the European Parliament - Replay

REPLAY HERE

A documentary separating the facts from the fiction about electromobility!

Live-streamed from the European Parliament on 7th September - 18:00

Zero-emission vehicles has been a huge topic on our agendas recently, and by 2035, these kind of vehicles will be one of our main means of transport. But do we really know what is inside electric cars and how do the supply chains really work?

To help policy makers better understand these questions, the documentary: “A CONTRESENS: electric vehicles, the great intox” (in French with English subtitles) will be proposed to MEPs on 7 September 2022 at 18:00 in the European Parliament.

We are pleased to inform you that the event will be live-streamed for external stakeholders so you can view the documentary and subsequent debate between MEPs and the movie makers Jonas Schneiter and Zelda Chauvet.

The documentary reveals the quest of two citizens in search of truth and coherence regarding zero-emission mobility. To separate the facts from fiction, engineer Marc Muller and journalist Jonas Schneiter set out to investigate what is behind electric vehicles. For two years, they went into the field to verify and/or challenge stereotypes. The findings of this investigation are summarised in the documentary film “A Contresens”.

For any question please contact: event@platformelectromobility.eu


[Video] Batteries are well placed to help Europe navigate the ‎current energy crisis

Batteries Regulation
Europe's main asset toward energy security

Batteries are necessary to fast forward electromobility, they store green energy, and can ensure critical infrastructure runs smoothly. In other words, batteries are critical to achieving the EU Green Deal objectives, and for the transition to renewables and electrification.

But the battery industry needs a fit for purpose policy framework to do so. In December 2020 the European Commission, proposed the new Batteries Regulation which is now being negotiated in trilogue.

It is key that the new Regulation enables a sustainable and competitive batteries value chain on our continent. The Regulation needs to introduce regulatory visibility for all players along the value chain on key aspects, including:

First, well-thought through timelines that would balance the need for a quick implementation of the ‎Regulation, whilst ensuring robust methodologies are developed.‎

Second, future potential restrictions of substances must take into consideration the impact onachieving strategic ‎autonomy for the EU battery sector, the performance of EV batteries, and the closed loop of the ‎substances needed for batteries.

And finally, correct definitions: of batteries as final products, and of the battery producer for Extended Producer Responsibility coherence. This will help establish a level playing field within and outside of the European Union.

We salute the Czech Presidency’s emphasis on promoting the EU energy security amid these uncertain times, and want to stress that batteries are naturally well placed to help Europe navigate the current energy crisis. We call for the Presidency to focus its attention on the Batteries Regulation


[Video] The importance of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive with Luka De Bruyckere (ECOS)

EPBD
The importance of private charging

If Europe is to succeed in its transition towards zero-emission mobility, the correct charging infrastructure needs to be put in place

Here, the deployment of private charging is of the utmost importance: 90% of all charging takes place at home or in the workplace. About 10% of charging will be done at public charging stations, either at fast charging stations on the highway for long distance trips or at slower charging stations for drivers who cannot charge at home. We at the Platform for electromobility want to make sure as many people as possible can charge at home.

The European Commission has recently proposed requirements to ease the installation of charging stations in building like condominiums or offices, as well as mandatory installation of charging stations at new and renovated buildings. These are very positive steps forward.

But we also need to make sure charging stations are easily installed in existing buildings as well because 4 out of 5 buildings will still be in use by 2050, and a large proportion will not be renovated any time soon it’s clear that we need to include existing buildings in the legislation now.

Also, the legislation should require the deployment “smart” technologies for vehicles. These can postpone charging or return electricity to the grid or the building. This presents opportunities for EV drivers: reduced energy prices, improved charging experience and increased renewable energy use. It is key that all newly installed chargers in buildings are capable of smart charging.

Finally, the right to plug should truly facilitate the installation of a charging station. This right does not really exist if construction costs are too high. This is why we also need to reinforce the measures to ensure pre-cabling: installing the cables needed to connect a charging station later on.


[Video] The need for flexibility services for deployment of electromobility - Brieuc Giard (SmartEN)

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EV Charging:
How to smart in the grid smartly?

Smart charging is a technology that enables communication between the electric vehicle and the electric grid when the car is plugged. Smart chargers can adjust the power input into the car very quickly depending on external signals like, prices, the stress on the grid or renewable energy production nearby. Those adjustments of power provide benefits to the EV driver and to the grid.

By turning EVs into a flexible asset, smart charging would help to integrate road transport into the energy system. This means we can optimize the use of the grid and reduce the investment needed . Smart charging will also help manage the availability of renewable energy, inherently variable. And therefore increase renewable penetration.

Smart charging will empower consumers in the energy transition by transforming their own vehicle into an flexible energy asset, a battery on wheels, and allow them to charge when electricity price is low.

Bidirectional charging is a technology that allow EVs to not only modulate the flow of energy, but send it back to a connected asset or to the grid. It would multiply the benefits for users and the grid.